Lacanian Psychoanalysis

People often ask what the difference is between psychoanalysis and other approaches to the treatment of psychical symptoms. Here are some introductory responses.

What kind of psychoanalysis do I practise?

How is psychoanalysis conducted?

How often are the sessions?

Is it confidential?


What kind of psychoanalysis do I practise?

My psychoanalytic orientation is Lacanian: that is, my theoretical base and clinical practice is drawn from the work of French psychiatrist and psychoanalyst Jacques Lacan who, in his reworking of the work of Sigmund Freud, not only radically rewrote that work but in the process formulated a distinct and original way of thinking and working psychoanalytically.

I chose Lacanian psychoanalysis for several reasons:

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How is psychoanalysis conducted?

There is one fundamental rule to psychoanalytic work: that the analysand speaks whatever is on his or her mind. This is the rule of ‘free association’: the continuous attempt to speak one’s thoughts, and to try to resist censoring oneself, so as to make one’s speech available to the encounter between analyst and analysand in the clinical setting.

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How often are the sessions?

Session frequency can be discussed during the preliminary interviews. Psychoanalysis is usually a medium to long-term process, and attending regularly and consistently is important.

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Is it confidential?

Identifying information about an analysand is never shared with any other person. Any discussions in supervision do not involve the use of names, and any information that may enable the analysand to be identified is changed or deleted.

If you have a question that isn’t answered here, you can email me at
or phone 0439 561 799

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What kind of psychoanalysis do I practise?

How is psychoanalysis conducted?

Do I work with people of any age?

How often are the sessions?

Is it confidential?


What kind of psychoanalysis do I practise?

There are many different approaches to psychoanalysis: Lacanian, Kleinian, Jungian, Freudian, among them. These approaches all have in common the idea fundamental to psychoanalysis: that there is an unconscious, and that the effective treatment of psychical symptoms can only take place if therapeutic work takes the unconscious into account.

My psychoanalytic orientation is Lacanian: that is, my theoretical base and clinical practice is drawn from the work of French psychiatrist and psychoanalyst Jacques Lacan who, in his reworking of the work of Sigmund Freud, not only radically rewrote that work but in the process formulated a distinct and original way of thinking and working psychoanalytically.

I chose Lacanian psychoanalysis for several reasons:

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How is psychoanalysis conducted?

There is one fundamental rule to psychoanalytic work, and it is quite simple. The analysand speaks whatever is on his or her mind. This is the rule of ‘free association’: what is thought is not censored, or edited, or eliminated, but is spoken and made available to the encounter between analyst and analysand in the clinical setting. Of course, free association is not all that easy: no-one can do it all the time, and sometimes censorship takes place before one even knows what one has thought. Nevertheless, free association is what is aimed at.

If the analysand is a child who is too young to speak or to speak a lot, the work takes place through play, drawing, building and other age-appropriate activities.

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Do I work with people of any age?

I work with people of all ages, including children and infants. If you are bringing a child to psychoanalysis, initial sessions may be conducted with parent/s and child together. The aim of these sessions is to obtain a family history as well as to establish a relationship with the child. The eventual aim is to see the child on his or her own when appropriate and possible.

For anyone interested in seeing how psychoanalysis can profoundly influence outcomes for infants, see Rosine and Robert Lefort’s book, The Birth of the Other (Other Press, New York).

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How often are the sessions?

The most effective way to work is to attend at least two sessions per week, but if this is not possible then once a week is the minimum. Psychoanalysis is usually a medium to long-term process, and attending twice a week ensures that it is not made any longer than necessary. If attending twice a week will cause financial hardship, then fees will be reduced by negotiation as necessary.

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Is it confidential?

Identifying information about an analysand is never shared with any other person. It is conventional as a psychoanalyst to have ongoing professional supervision with another psychoanalyst, and to discuss cases. Any case discussions do not involve the use of names, and any information that may enable the analysand to be identified is changed or deleted.

If you have a question that isn’t answered here, you can email me at
or phone 0439 561 799

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